Books about Free Settlers

Free Settlers and Convicts in Early Australia
This is a story of contrasting histories between English free settler and convict families and how they came together in the cities and countryside of New South Wales, Australia. Arriving in the 1830’s and forging new lives as pioneers in a land where the sun shone daily and there was space for all, and opportunities abounded. Based on an amazing array of letters and rich journals left behind by the travelers, the story is highly factual and embellished with an incredible array of supportive research facts and images, along with entertaining descriptive elements of specific incidents and environmental circumstances.
Infinity Publishing 660 pages $34.95 Click to purchase

Books about Free Settlers

Better than London
This is the true story of the joys, the heartaches, the trials, and the tribulations of two families of English social pioneers in Australia during the years when the country struggled to throw off its penal heritage. Bravery, curiosity, flexibility and adaptability were necessities of survival. Along with their mother, Eliza and her brother Joseph, both teachers, exemplified the spirit of those who helped establish the path for what Australia has become today.
Booklocker 270 pages $16.95 paperback, $2.99 ebook Click to purchase

Books about Free Settlers

The Irish Australian Monaghans
In the early 1800s greedy agrarian landlords in Ireland increased taxes and rents for the tenant farmers who worked their lands. Already poor, rural families suffered terribly. When the British bounty scheme was introduced to encourage free settlers to migrate to Australia, many tenant families saw it as potential salvation from the miserable lives they were experiencing. Large families gave up their homes, said goodbye to relatives and friends, and trudged across country to the nearest port. Fearful, with only their faith to cling to, they spent four perilous months at sea heading to an unknown destination.
The Monaghans left LondonDerry in 1840 and arrived in Australia just as a depression hit the country. They scrounged for work, straddling hardship again, wondering whether they had made the right decision to migrate. The penal colony was slowly transitioning to amore balanced civilization, but free settlers were still a minority.
This is the story of a courageous family chronicling how individual members adapted to their new environment and joined other pioneers in helping create a more attractive culture in an alien land.
CreateSpace 404 pages $11.39 Paperback, $9.99 Kindle Click to purchase

Books about Free Settlers

Regentville
This book traces the life of one of the great early Australians – Sir John Jamison. He was a man of high intellectual and practical endeavour. Over his lifetime, he was the friend of governors and convicts, be the latter servants or emancipists. He was a truly remarkable man who had an influence on Australian politics, economics, exploration, sports, agriculture, education, and justice.
The majority of the story takes place in the period 1800-1850 as the original colony slowly grew from a penal settlement to a broad-based civilization with its own unique culture. Men like Sir John were pioneers in creating that culture. It was a time when leaders emerged from various walks of life. Sir John gave up his medical and nautical careers to become a businessman and statesman of unique talent and individuality. He was an incredibly wealthy entrepreneur who often flaunted the rules of society with audacious behavior, siring many children with convict –related mistresses but marrying only shortly before his death.
Sir John amazed his contemporaries by building a magnificent abode 35 miles from Sydney on the banks of the Nepean River. The vast estate and its incredible mansion went by the name of Regentville. Over 100 convicts were employed there and it became an elegant retreat for governors, other ranking officials, and explorers of note. Lavish, hedonistic balls attracted varied echelons of high society.
Sir John died there leaving a remarkable legacy unmatched by any follower.
The story is based on years of in-depth physical and electronic research. Where detailed facts were not available for certain events I have tried to fairly represent the spirit of the populace, the place, and the character of Sir John.
Since much is subject to personal interpretation it must be realized that, even so, this remains a work of fiction.
Unpublished at this time

Books about Free Settlers

The Wrights of Glenorchy
Well-to-do property owners, shrewd investors, responsible job holders – the Wright family had lived in West London for a century. Friends of painters, poets and scholars, their lives were comfortable and enjoyable until rural flight brought thousands of west country peasants across the Thames to their corner of the world. With increasing crime and squalor and poverty destroying the communities they had built and served, the Wrights became increasingly dispossessed over their perceived entitlements. Australia, with its rapid progress from a criminal state to a semi-free society seemed to be moving the other way, and the opportunities for investment and business pursuit appealed to the young adult men of the family.
So they crossed the dangerous seas to Adelaide, with parents following a few years later. They took their place in society with two sons eventually rising to the station of Mayor. Their industry, intelligence, business acumen and networking skills helped create powerful and influential friends. And when they moved to Tasmania, their experience and creativity transferred with them. The family settled north of Hobart at O’Brien’s Bridge, later part of Glenorchy, on a fertile 100 acre property bounded by a plentiful rivulet of fresh flowing water and the majestic Derwent River. There the family established a beautiful estate called The Grove - raising hops and apples, and became pioneers in establishing the Tasmanian fruit industry, and in exporting apples back to the motherland. Yet never forgetting their workers, they built churches and sporting facilities that encouraged a flourishing, thankful community.
A story of innovation, and risk taking, and a love for fellow man that set standards and values in fruit growing, architecture, and landscaping - influencing Tasmanian society for nearly 100 years.
CreateSpace 118 pages $9.95 Paperback Click to purchase

$2.99 Kindle Click to purchase

Books about Free Settlers

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